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Postproduction

Commercial Cuts

It takes a special breed of talent to edit commercials. Specialty editors in the world of 30-second commercial spots describe it as fun and fast with a turnaround of a few days to a week. “You’re not on something for months; you’re on it for a few days,” says Matthew Wilson, the in-house editor for danAppelcreative in Los Angeles, Calif.

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DI Comes in All Sizes

di_company3_post-house_sfwThe digital intermediate (DI) has become an accepted part of the workflow for feature films ─ from the biggest blockbusters to smaller-budget independents. There are currently an enormous number of tools to get the job done, including software-based systems and the DI systems with the most bells and whistles. P3 Update has taken a look at some recent DI work to see the challenges that DI artists are facing and the tools they use to complete the job.

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LOOK Effects Takes on "Limitless"

Visual Effects can transport, captivate and visually illuminate a story while taking the audience places they dare to dream about.  LOOK Effects’ New York, a visual effects production facility recently worked on the visual effects for Neil Burger’s latest thriller, Limitless, staring Bradley Cooper and Robert De Niro.

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Color Correcting

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The digital intermediate (DI) is often a high-ticket item in the postproduction budget, but more and more independent filmmakers are still able to finish their films with a flourish. Even better, top-end tools from such well-respected manufacturers as Blackmagic Design and FilmLight are part of the equation.

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Editing in 3D

Df-04531_SFWAt Oasis Imagery in Hollywood, Calif., Chief Visionary Officer Scot Barbour has created the setup for the offline and finishing of the Russian 3D film Napoleon. The editor chose Avid Media Composer Nitris DX as his tool, and Barbour reports that he has set two workstations up connected to a Unity.

“There are a few choices to editing 3D,” Barbour explains. “You can cut the project with [Apple] Final Cut Pro (FCP) or Avid. One method is to use the codec CineForm, which is a great workflow when the editor wants to take it home. But you start in CineForm, you have to finish in the CineForm Neo3D codec.” Barbour likes to set up the system so that in the Avid or FCP system monitor the editor has three views: the left eye, the right eye and the combined image. “In the editing application, instead of one picture, you have three pictures to choose from,” he says.

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