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Effects

The Industry Transitions to Ultra High-Def

272003253The hot technological buzz phrase for today’s theatrical distribution and consumer space is “4K.” While the current digital cinema standard is an image resolution of 2048 pixels wide by 1080 pixels high (with width measurement rounded out to 2K), digital capture technology and projection technology is now at resolutions of 4096×2160 or higher — and 4K actually quadruples the number of pixels for richer screen resolution. On the consumer side, the HDTV standard delivers the same vertical resolution (1080) but isn’t quite as wide, with a resolution of 1920 pixels instead of 2048. Earlier this year, consumers were introduced to the new Ultra High Definition (UHD) format that delivers a resolution of 3840x2160. And even though that horizontal resolution is well shy of the 4,000 pixel mark, it’s still promoted as 4K.

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Apple’s Mac Pro Update Supports 4K Digital Video

 

MacPro4KToday’s higher resolution cameras and postproduction standards have led Apple to up the ante on the latest model of its Mac Pro desktop system. Now supporting 4K digital video, the newest Mac Pro features a very slick-looking chrome cylindrical design that, like other desktop systems, requires the user to attach an external keyboard, rodent and display. The new system offers Thunderbolt 2 and dual AMD FirePro graphics processing units with up to six gigabytes of dedicated VRAM, which is enough horsepower to drive three 4K displays simultaneously — an ideal scenario for pro video workstations, visual effects work in cinema, and film editing. 

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New Visual Effects/Post Hub Debuts in Buffalo

Buffalo SMNew York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo has announced that a new postproduction, visual effects and animation company will be established at the landmark Tri-Main Center in Buffalo. According to a statement by the New York State Governor’s Office for Motion Picture and Television Development, the facility is expected to create 150 new visual effects and other post jobs within five years, and will pave the way for a new postproduction and visual effects industry in Western New York. 

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The ATTO ExpressSAS R680 RAID Adapter

To effectively edit high-end HD projects you’ll need a RAID, which is just a bunch of hard drives working together to deal with the huge amounts of video data that are being manipulated. And if you’re editing DV at 25Mbits/sec, you’ll have no worries as 25Mb divided by 8 bits per byte equals only a bit over 3MB/sec, which any hard drive can handle. But there’s a problem when you work with larger formats, like the one recorded on Blackmagic Design’s HyperDeck Shuttle. The full, uncompressed 10-bit recording rate of 1264Mb/sec or 158MB/sec is more than any regular hard drive is going to be able to handle. An SSD can deal with the speeds, but who can afford to own terabytes of SSDs? What you are left with is SATA and SAS drive RAID arrays to process all of your data.

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Color Correcting with Technicolor’s Dave Cole

Technicolor Senior Digital Colorist Dave Cole is known for his expertise on a long list of major film releases, including Warrior, Act of Valor, TRON: Legacy, The Ides of March and the Alvin and the Chipmunks trilogy. P3 recently spoke with Cole about the impact of digital cameras, the importance of having a colorist involved early in the production process, and how working effectively requires the support of a good team.

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