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Friday, 25 July 2014 18:19

A Conversation with Director/Writer Luc Besson

Written by  Thea Green
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Most people wish they could tap into all of their brain at all times, but there’s no coffee on earth that can create that feeling.

Lucy however, is able to access super-human brainpower after a drug that she is carrying in her body begins to leak. Director/Writer Luc Besson, known for The Fifth Element and the well-loved Léon: The Professional talked to Den of Geek about his experience with Lucy and where the spark of the film started years ago.  

The idea for the film came to life when Besson attended a dinner thrown by the mayor ten years ago while promoting a movie. He began a conversation with a professor studying nuclear cells, who was seated next to him. “I was really not expecting at all to be next to a person like this. And then we started to talk for hours and I got very excited about what I learned. And then I started to read a couple of books and a couple of years later I met this professor who works on the brain. We became friends and I became a founder of an institute that does research about the brain. So I swam in this environment for a couple of years and I have this feeling that I needed to know more really about what’s going on before we even start to write the script.”

Lucy put to use the talent of Industrial Light and Magic for visual effects and Besson allowed a no rules environment for enhanced creativity. “It was very free, you know. We said, come back with everything you want. Come back with crazy stuff, that’s okay. You’re free. No pattern to follow or no guidance or things like this. We did that for a month or two just to let their minds be totally free. And some of the stuff was really crazy and totally out of purpose. But there was a bunch of things that were very much in the tone of the film, which I kept. It was a very nice group to work with.”

Besson mentioned that the film will raise questions for a curious audience. “I like when you get out of a film and it stays with you and you ask questions and you want to talk about it because you don’t have all the answers. I love that. I love this feeling. I hate when you get out of the theater and the first thing is, ‘Where are we gonna eat?’” (Den of Geek)

 

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